History of garden sheds

Sheds were first heard in the UK towards the end of the fifteenth century, from a printer named William Caxton.

It is believed that sheds have Anglo-Saxon roots and that they were used throughout villages in the country for many years. William Caxton left behind documents that explained what they were used to store: tools, even live animals.

From then on, the shed grew to be an essential feature for households around Europe but was most popular during the Victorian era. Ladies would set up their own greenhouses, workshops and potting sheds in the garden to where they were about to sit out of the house.

Between the first and second World War, a variety of companies’ interest sparked in sheds thus they started selling pre-assembled packs to the masses. To begin with, the structures were basic, sturdy, and notably inexpensive compared to their Victorian ancestors. Sheds quickly became the storage house that were the quick and easy way to obtain that additional extra space to their gardens, as well as adding more value to their properties; at the same time, the uses for sheds expanded.

Sheds, to this day, remain easy to maintain and build and convenient for storage.

To view our sheds, please visit our websites!

Buying a garden shed: tips

You’ve decided to purchase a garden shed, however, you aren’t too sure which is suitable for your garden.

We’ve compiled a selection of tips in order to help you select the best shed for your garden or allotment.

What material?

First of all you will want to choose what type of shed you want for your garden, the most popular are wooden and steel sheds. Wooden sheds are made from softwoods like pine or spruce.

Steel sheds are incredibly robust, haven’t the threat of burning down and are resistant to rot. They are customisable by colour and can slot into any part of a garden.

Plastic sheds are not uncommon; they are relatively maintenance free and are easily assembled. Aesthetically, they may not meet the quality standard’s for some people.

What size?

Depending on the space that is available, it is recommended that you choose a shed that is at least 6ft x 8ft. This is a suitable size shed for working as the wise spaced flooring allows for a work bench to be placed along one side.

If you’re choosing a shed for a relatively small space, ensure that you are aware of the precise dimensions.

Sturdiness

Over time, a feeble shed could possibly experience a sagging roof, distorted sides, alongside a door that may not close properly.

You can check the sturdiness of a shed by walking inside the shed and jumping in the centre of the floor, also pushing against the centre of the of the side panels and roof panels – you should feel a firm resistance which will indicate its sturdiness.

With these tips, we hope you can find a shed that is suitable to you needs!

Please visit our website to view our range of steel sheds and more!

 

 

 

 

Caring for a metal shed

You have a metal shed that is protecting all of your outdoor equipment but you don’t really know how to care for it.

Metal sheds are affordable and provide decent storage space. They are quick to install and often have less waste when they are manufactured – as with all metal structures and buildings alike they are vulnerable to weathering so there’s a necessary for annual maintenance.

Protecting your shed from water:

– Examine the roof of the shed for miniature holes that will allow water to seep into the shed.
– Use the waterproof caulking to fill any voids so that the water will not leak and cause any more damage.
– Check if the sides and base of the shed have any holes. Seal any of them that are apparent with waterproof caulking.
– Don’t forget to examine the base of the shed. If rainwater collects in a pool near the base, it will be necessary to pack dirt around the perimeter of the shed, applied in a downwards slope, away from the shed.

Maintain your sheds’ appearance;

– Locate any scratches or areas on the shed with peeling paint and using an exterior primer and paint, cover or touch up all of the areas where the metal is exposed. Doing so will prevent any rust damaging the metal.
– If you happen to find any larger holes, use a specific sandpaper for metal and sand the affected area, and try to remove as much rust as you can if the area is rusty. You can purchase a piece of sheet metal and JB Weld Epoxy from your local home centre and after cutting a piece of sheet metal slightly larger than the hole, use the JB Weld Epoxy and glue it over the hole and then seal the edges with waterproof caulking on the inside and the outside.
– For the finishing touch, prime and paint the area, inside and out.

See our range of colours available for your steel sheds!

How to prevent condensation in a steel shed

What can you do to prevent condensation in a steel shed?

Naturally, having stored all of your valuable items in your brand new steel shed, you’ll want to avoid damage to your items at all costs. Though you may not know it, your items are at danger to condensation. The frequent problems offered up by condensation in your steel shed can be avoided, so taking these various steps and putting in precautions allows avoiding problems in the future, removing the problem forever.

You won’t be a stranger to the concept of condensation, as it probably exists in your car every morning. Condensation happens in various weather conditions, as the windscreen shows the evidence on the inside and outside. Using the cold air blower, it allows for you to remove all hot air, removing the condensation. Fortunately, condensation doesn’t cause any lasting problems in your car, yet it may have lasting effects on your steel shed in your garden.

How exactly does condensation work?

Firstly, it’s good to know that there’s water in the air at all times, though the amount of water in the air varies from time of the day/month. When the level of water in the air is high and it finds a cold surface, it forms an amount of water droplets on the surface – this is the condensation that you see on the surface of your steel shed.

If you were to walk into your steel shed in the afternoon or early evening, you’d discover that the inside of your shed would be similar to that of the temperature outside. As the evening grows closer into the night, the air temperature is set to get colder because the sun is disappeared. However, the temperature inside your shed won’t change much as the warm air is still trapped inside the structure.

As the air outside gets colder, the outer walls of your steel shed get colder. As the coolness of the metal meets the warm air, the condensation will then form on the inside of your shed. It’s normal for condensation to be on the roof of your shed, as warm air rises.

How can I prevent condensation from forming?

Most people take to installing their steel shed on a solid concrete foundation, which eliminates the risk of moisture meeting the inside of your shed. Given there isn’t a moisture barrier in place, water moves from the ground upwards towards the inside of your shed. If you’re able to put a water barrier underneath the concrete foundation on which your shed sits, it’s helpful to know that this will help you considerably in the future.

The second action to take in this process is to give ventilation access for your steel shed. Putting this system at the highest part of your roof will allow for air to enter and access the shed. Installing this in your shed will allow warm air existing in your shed to escape into the evening air. The reduction of moisture levels in your shed leads to the safe keeping of your items.

The prevention of condensation in your steel shed isn’t specifically a difficult task to undertake, yet you’ll need to ensure that air holes are protected against rust.

For more on the safekeeping of your items and health of your steel shed, please visit our website.

What’s better: a steel, wooden or plastic shed?

So, what exactly is better? A steel shed? A wooden design? Plastic? We discuss this and more in our latest blog

Wooden, steel and plastic sheds are all popular backyard storage systems, as they have been in the gardens of millions for as long as we can remember. Often being utilized as a workshop or a storage unit for your gardening tools or equipment due to their sheer size, homeowners often have plenty of options available to them when choosing a shed for their needs. Sheds vary in size, structure and most importantly cost. Generally, sheds are built of a single room structure with a door. If you are torn between steel, plastic and wooden sheds, here’s why you should opt for the best option: steel.

Wooden Sheds

Though wooden sheds are considered the most popular of the three types, they’re incredibly susceptible to water damage and weathering. This type of shed is mostly ideal for a child playhouse. Wood easily blends in to most backyard surroundings, so this is why it’s usually a popular choice amongst homeowners and gardeners, simply for its aesthetical value.

Wooden sheds aren’t exactly cheap; they can be the most expensive of all three options. Wooden sheds also offer other drawbacks too. Out of the three, if it’s not properly stained or varnished, wood is the most susceptible from insect, termite and mold infestation. Wooden sheds requires a whole lot more maintenance compared to their steel or plastic counterparts. If you live in an area that has monsoon season, be aware that this will weaken the wood’s condition, making them easily susceptible to rotting.

Plastic Sheds

The plastic shed is the most cost effective of the three, yet you’re sacrificing cost for cheap design and durability. The only real benefit of a plastic shed is the benefits it holds towards plants (as plastic is commonly used for greenhouses). Plastic sheds can actually withstand the problems that wooden sheds owners usually encounter as the structure of plastic doesn’t crumble to such ailments. The structure resists moisture, insect infestations and rotting.

The limited style changes of the plastic shed’s limits the design and it’s seen as one of its main drawbacks. Most homeowners sacrifice its withstanding of weathering problems to favour a wooden shed’s aesthetic value.

An example of a plastic shed
An example of a plastic shed

Steel Sheds

Steel sheds are made from steel, obviously, yet they can also be made from aluminium and iron. These attributes are attached to their longevity and durability to damages, weather, mold and more. Due to its material structure, steel sheds are amazingly adept to being fire and termite proof, whilst offering superior resistance to bugs, mildew, mold and fungal growth. It’s seen as the most safe bet in terms of security as the strength and durability of the shed is viewed as a good investment through its offer of high safety standards compared to its counterparts. Shed’s are often targeted more than homes due to their valuable contents like garden equipment – lawn mower, water pumps, etc and steel sheds are fantastic at defending such break in attempts.

The only downside of a steel shed is that without treatment, it can be susceptible to moisture, yet this is down to lack of care for the shed itself. A proper treatment of the shed will allow for a design and structure that can defend against pretty much all of the things that damage both wooden and plastic sheds. It is recommended to properly treat your metal sheds and it will be with you for life. Steel structures are a fantastic addition to any household, as many builders even offer to custom build these items to fit your needs and space.

What do you think of our blog? We want to hear your points of view!

For more on steel sheds that last a lifetime, please visit our website.

How to do a spring clean of the garden shed

The spring clean is always important, but do you do it for your garden shed?

Spring cleaning is a term that can confuse many. It fills your mind with images of rooms cluttered with “rubbish” that needs to go. Windows get thrown open, rugs and linens are washing and hung out to dry as the sun shines down for your cleaning activities. Right? Well, sort of. The phrase “spring cleaning” is originally thought to have come from Europe, where homes and castles alike would open their windows in the early spring to welcome the warm air to pass through their homes whilst a deep clean from the previous months would take place. As most of these homes were heated via fires, soot and dust was bound to accumulate during the cold winters that batter their homes as the heat would be turned up. It’s actually a tradition in Scotland to “spring clean” on December 31st in order to prepare their homes for the coming year and all that it has to offer.

The airing out process is a healthy way to de-clutter all of the things we collect over the year. Most notably all of the old things that are filling up your garden shed! The first thing to do is to simply empty the shed of all that it holds; your garden tools, the kids bikes, everything! If the weather’s good enough, maybe you should consider cleaning up the tools too?

It's always good to give the garden shed a clean out!
It’s always good to give the garden shed a clean out!

Having bags for your rubbish at the ready is vital in order to quickly get rid of what you don’t need. The more time you spend clearing out your shed, the more time you’ll have pondering on whether or not that 12 year old pair of shears might come in handy soon, rust and all. Remember that things like fertilisers, paint and chemicals should all be disposed of the proper way, so don’t just chuck all of these into black bags and hope for the best.

Once the shed is emptied of its contents, give it a thorough clean out. A good old thorough sweeping should get ride of most of the debris that will no doubt be collected over the cold winter months. The windows can be cleaned, simply, with a mixture of vinegar and water. Any cleaning product you use should be fine, just be sure to give the shed time to air out as trying to store everything back in quickly may do more bad than good for your shed. Check the quality of the roof and floor, particularly checking the walls for any gaps that may have found their way into the shed. Finding it early on and dealing with the problem as soon as is much better for the overall health of the shed.

After your cleaning work on the tools and equipment that the shed houses is completed and your tools are ready for the work that they will vigorously carry out in the coming weeks, start placing them back into the shed. If you use shelving units in your shed, be sure to clean these down, regardless of what they hold. Get into a mind frame of cleanliness for your shed and the reorganisation will be easy! The little bits and bobs should be restored into your shed first, as this will allow for the larger items to be stored quickly.

By doing this in the early spring, it ensures that your gardening equipment is going to be kept in tip top condition for the hard work they’re going to face in the coming weeks. It’s always good to have a clean out and start a fresh!