How to do a spring clean of the garden shed

The spring clean is always important, but do you do it for your garden shed?

Spring cleaning is a term that can confuse many. It fills your mind with images of rooms cluttered with “rubbish” that needs to go. Windows get thrown open, rugs and linens are washing and hung out to dry as the sun shines down for your cleaning activities. Right? Well, sort of. The phrase “spring cleaning” is originally thought to have come from Europe, where homes and castles alike would open their windows in the early spring to welcome the warm air to pass through their homes whilst a deep clean from the previous months would take place. As most of these homes were heated via fires, soot and dust was bound to accumulate during the cold winters that batter their homes as the heat would be turned up. It’s actually a tradition in Scotland to “spring clean” on December 31st in order to prepare their homes for the coming year and all that it has to offer.

The airing out process is a healthy way to de-clutter all of the things we collect over the year. Most notably all of the old things that are filling up your garden shed! The first thing to do is to simply empty the shed of all that it holds; your garden tools, the kids bikes, everything! If the weather’s good enough, maybe you should consider cleaning up the tools too?

It's always good to give the garden shed a clean out!
It’s always good to give the garden shed a clean out!

Having bags for your rubbish at the ready is vital in order to quickly get rid of what you don’t need. The more time you spend clearing out your shed, the more time you’ll have pondering on whether or not that 12 year old pair of shears might come in handy soon, rust and all. Remember that things like fertilisers, paint and chemicals should all be disposed of the proper way, so don’t just chuck all of these into black bags and hope for the best.

Once the shed is emptied of its contents, give it a thorough clean out. A good old thorough sweeping should get ride of most of the debris that will no doubt be collected over the cold winter months. The windows can be cleaned, simply, with a mixture of vinegar and water. Any cleaning product you use should be fine, just be sure to give the shed time to air out as trying to store everything back in quickly may do more bad than good for your shed. Check the quality of the roof and floor, particularly checking the walls for any gaps that may have found their way into the shed. Finding it early on and dealing with the problem as soon as is much better for the overall health of the shed.

After your cleaning work on the tools and equipment that the shed houses is completed and your tools are ready for the work that they will vigorously carry out in the coming weeks, start placing them back into the shed. If you use shelving units in your shed, be sure to clean these down, regardless of what they hold. Get into a mind frame of cleanliness for your shed and the reorganisation will be easy! The little bits and bobs should be restored into your shed first, as this will allow for the larger items to be stored quickly.

By doing this in the early spring, it ensures that your gardening equipment is going to be kept in tip top condition for the hard work they’re going to face in the coming weeks. It’s always good to have a clean out and start a fresh!